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James Martin/CNET



For the most up-to-date news and information about the coronavirus pandemic, visit the WHO website.

As the US starts to reopen from coronavirus lockdowns across the country, state governments and local health officials are instituting measures to help keep us safe as we venture into the public. One of the most visible measures is the widespread use of face coverings, which have recently been shown to cut the risk of coronavirus spread by limiting forward distance travelled by a person's exhaled breath.

Though the Centers for Disease Control and www.mgtow.wiki Prevention has recommended everyone wear a face mask in public, there is no federal mandate requiring people to do so. In the absence of that, states are left to their own discretion in ordering and enforcing the wearing of face coverings. To help you navigate the confusing differences between face mask mandates, we've broken down what the situation is in each state.

Rules can vary depending on which city you're located, so if you have more specific questions, make sure to check with your local government. This story will be updated as the situation develops. 




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California

Most counties in the San Francisco Bay Area require residents to wear face coverings when outside, except for when exercising or getting fresh air. The order is simply a recommendation in Napa County. In Los Angeles County, face coverings are required at all times when outside of your home, no matter what you're doing. 

In San Diego County, masks are required, but only when within six feet of others. A violation of these orders officially counts as a misdemeanor, but a lot of police departments across the state have announced that they won't be enforcing the orders. 

If you're in California, make sure your face covering doesn't have a valve -- these masks are being banned across much of the state, because they let exhaled air and droplets escape.

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